definition
WOD

tyro


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for December 2, 2020 is:

tyro • TYE-roh  • noun

: a beginner in learning : novice

Examples:

The ranch has one riding trail for tyros and several more challenging options for experienced riders.

“In ‘Zucked,’ Roger McNamee winces at the memory of his introduction to Mark Zuckerberg. It was 2006 and he played the grizzled industry elder to Zuckerberg’s tyro.” — Stephen Phillips, The San Francisco Chronicle, 10 Feb. 2019

Did you know?

The word tyro is hardly a newcomer to Western language. It comes from the Latin tiro, which means “young soldier,” “new recruit,” or more generally, “novice.” The word was sometimes spelled tyro as early as Medieval Latin, and can be spelled tyro or tiro in English (though tyro is the more common American spelling). Use of tyro in English has never been restricted to the original “young soldier” meaning of the Latin term. Writers in the 17th and 18th centuries wrote of tyros in various fields and occupations, and Herman Melville used tyro to refer to men new to whaling and life at sea. The word also has a long history of being used attributively—that is, directly before another noun—in phrases like “tyro reporter” and “tyro actors.”

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