definition
WOD

lodestone


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 16, 2021 is:

lodestone • LOHD-stohn  • noun

1 : magnetite possessing polarity

2 : something that strongly attracts

Examples:

“… the city was a lodestone of rock-and-roll and rhythm-and-blues innovation.” — John Beifuss, The Memphis (Tennessee) Commercial Appeal, 2 Nov. 2020

“[Britney] Spears … became a vessel for our intense emotions, but in the process, she would also become a lodestone for criticism of an entire generation’s tastes and habits.” — Craig Jenkins, Vulture, 17 Feb. 2021

Did you know?

Lodestone is made up of distinctly English components, ones that have been part of our language since before the 12th century. Lode comes from the Old English lād, which means “way, journey, course.” The word stone derives from the Old English stān, which had the same meaning as the modern term stone. When the two ancient words were combined to form lodestone in the early 16th century, the new term referred to magnetite, a magnetic iron ore. Just as a new business district might be a magnet for entrepreneurs, or a poor soul a magnet for bad luck, lodestone sees similar figurative use describing things with a seeming power to attract.

Ken Saunders is a freelance writer for hire. He specializes in creating content that will drive traffic, convert readers and make your social media pop. He has been writing since 2012. His professional background is in Information Technology as well as Health and Wellness. His experience has given him a broad base from which to approach many topics. He especially enjoys researching and writing articles on the topics of Spirituality, Technology, Food, Travel, and the LGBT community. His articles have appeared in a number of e-zine sites, including Lifehack. Media, Andrew Christian, TogetherWeWin.com and Vocal.media. You can learn more about his services at http://www.ken-saunders.info.

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