definition
WOD

divagate


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for June 14, 2020 is:

divagate • DYE-vuh-gayt  • verb

: to wander or stray from a course or subject : diverge, digress

Examples:

The novel divagates and meanders through a labyrinth of subplots and asides.

“Having spirited us briskly through Manhattan, New Bedford and Nantucket, and having flushed Ahab from his lair on to the deck of the Pequod, Herman Melville divagates into a disquisition on whale taxonomies.” — Stephen Phillips, The Spectator, 2 Nov. 2019

Did you know?

Divagate hasn’t wandered far in meaning from its Latin ancestors. It descends from the verb divagari, which comes from dis-, meaning “apart,” and vagari, meaning “to wander.” Vagari also gave us vagabond, meaning “a wanderer with no home,” and extravagant, an early, now archaic, sense of which was “wandering away.” Latin vagari is also probably the source of our noun vagary, which now usually means “whim or caprice” but originally meant “journey, excursion, or tour.” Even the verb stray may have evolved from vagari, by way of Vulgar Latin extravagare. Today, divagate can suggest a wandering or straying that is literal (as in “the hikers divagated from the trail”), but it is more often used figuratively (as in “she divagated from the topic”).

Ken Saunders is a freelance writer for hire. He specializes in creating content that will drive traffic, convert readers and make your social media pop. He has been writing since 2012. His professional background is in Information Technology as well as Health and Wellness. His experience has given him a broad base from which to approach many topics. He especially enjoys researching and writing articles on the topics of Spirituality, Technology, Food, Travel, and the LGBT community. His articles have appeared in a number of e-zine sites, including Lifehack. Media, Andrew Christian, TogetherWeWin.com and Vocal.media. You can learn more about his services at http://www.ken-saunders.info.

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